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Frequently Asked Questions about becoming a Correctional Officer

If I'm hired as a temporary employee, how long before I am eligible for a permanent appointment?

How much is a correctional officer paid annually?

What benefits are available to permanent employees of the Department of Corrections?

What promotional opportunities exist in the Vermont Department of Corrections?

What is the "down side" of becoming a correctional officer?

Whom do I contact if I have more questions?

If I'm hired as a temporary employee, how long before I am eligible for a permanent appointment?

It depends on how many correctional officers are promoted or separated from state service for any reason at your facility. It also depends on your performance as a correctional officer. Finally, it may also be the result of an increase in the number of positions given to the Department of Corrections because of prison expansion.

Fortunately for the job seeker, the Department of Corrections continues to experience tremendous growth.

Every State of Vermont employee must complete a 6-month initial probation period.

How much is a correctional officer paid annually?

The following link illustrates how much an officer may earn in base salary. Please bear in mind that officers are eligible and in some cases required to perform overtime duties at the rate of time-and-a-half of the hourly pay.

Check out this link for information on State Compensation

What benefits are available to permanent employees of the Department of Corrections?

Every permanent state employee is entitled to medical and dental benefits, a retirement program, annual leave, sick leave and other contracted benefits. Fort more detailed information, visit the Vermont Department of Personnel's Benefits page.

What promotional opportunities exist in the Vermont Department of Corrections?

The Vermont Department of Corrections is one of the largest State of Vermont agencies. Almost half of the Department's employees are in uniform as entry level correctional officers, correctional officers II, and shift supervisors. These are also a number of correctional officers not in uniform helping to supervise offenders in the community along with probation and parole officers.

Many probation and parole officers, supervisors and managers currently employed in the Department began their careers as correctional officers.

What is the "down side" of becoming a correctional officer?

It's a challenging job. You're going to be dealing with people who don't always show respect for others. Often they are lacking in social skills and have poor impulse control. That is why the Department emphasizes initial and on-going training. The highly trained officer is confident and can handle most situations. On rare occasions, such as the use of force, a response that includes teamwork, not individual action, is preferred.

Sometimes you must work when you'd rather be doing something else. A correctional facility must be staffed properly to keep the environment safe and orderly. If there is an unexpected sick leave, for example, an officer may have to be "ordered over" his or her shift because a post position must have an officer in it. Fortunately, the union contract favors those employees who volunteer for overtime in order to minimize those times when an employee must be "ordered over."

Whom do I contact if I have more questions?

James Rice

Academy Adminitstrator

Office Phone: 802.461.8452

Email James.Rice@vermont.gov

or

John Leibold

Academy Operations Training Coordinator

Office Phone: 802.272.6849

Email Jonathan.Leibold@vermont.gov

For help with the contents of this web page you can contact.

Ross T. Farnsworth

HRD Training Coordinator, Vermont Correctional Academy

Office Phone: 802-885-9736

Email Ross.Farnsworth@vermont.gov